Miami Beach’s Flamingo Park fastest to Slow Streets

Last week this Miami Beach neighborhood became the first in Miami-Dade to adopt “Slow Streets,” a program geared to make residential streets safer by discouraging non-local traffic and educating the community about slow driving speeds. 

The pilot, city Commissioner Mark Samuelian said, has been approved by the county and will run for 30 days before being evaluated. If feedback is positive, he continued, other neighborhoods and cities could pick up the initiative. 

During the pandemic, Mr. Samuelian said, transportation needs evolved and many residents found themselves engaging in more outdoor activities such as running, cycling and walking. This program, he said, is an effort to meet this changing demand and foster outdoor activity in a safer space.

Essentially, he said, residential streets in this neighborhood are now targeted with signs at their entrance discouraging “through traffic,” mandating slow speeds and encouraging biking and walking. The aim, he said, is to get non-residents looking to cut through neighborhoods to get to a destination to avoid these streets.

The program, Mr. Samuelian said, is just one step in a larger plan to make Miami Beach more accessible for pedestrians and cyclists. Other initiatives, he said, include adding protected bike lanes on Washington Avenue and the ongoing effort to consider pedestrianizing Ocean Drive. 

“My vision for Ocean Drive,” he said, “is one that puts people and pedestrians first. I view Slow Streets as another important step in this journey.”

October 27, 2020 | Miami Today | Miami Beach’s Flamingo Park fastest to Slow Streets

Getting across the Venetian Causeway during rush hour could soon get a lot easier

This isn’t the first time Miami Beach has petitioned to lock down a bridge during peak traffic periods. In 2015, Commissioner Micky Steinberg — who sponsored the Venetian Causeway resolution with Commissioners Mark Samuelian and Michael Góngora — started the process of changing the operating schedule for the 63rd Street Bridge that spans Indian Creek. The effort took more than a year, but the bridge now stays closed during rush hour.

April 10, 2019 | The Miami Herald | Getting across the Venetian Causeway during rush hour could soon get a lot easier

Cruzar el Venetian Causeway en las horas pico pronto pudiera ser más fácil

Esta no es la primera vez que Miami Beach ha pedido que no se levanten los puentes durante las horas de más tráfico. En el 2015, el comisionado Micky Steinberg, quien patrocinó la resolución sobre el Venetian Causeway con el comisionado Mark Samuelian, inició el proceso de cambiar el horario de operación del puente de la 63 Street, que pasa por encima de Indian Creek. El esfuerzo demoró más de un año, pero ahora ese puente permanece cerrado durante las horas pico.

10 de Abril de 2019 | El Nuevo Herald | Cruzar el Venetian Causeway en las horas pico pronto pudiera ser más fácil

Miami Beach to explore making Ocean Drive a one-way street

…Commissioner Mark Samuelian, a member of the Ocean Drive Safety, Security and Infrastructure Subcommittee, said, “I think it’s prudent that we proceed… there will be a lot of opportunities to review it.”

March 30, 2019 | RE: Miami Beach | Miami Beach to explore making Ocean Drive a one-way street

As massive construction project looms, Miami Beach studies ‘emergency’ traffic measures

Miami Beach officials are already bracing for gridlock and phone calls from irate residents.

“We know this train is coming, no pun intended, we know it’s going to have a big impact,” said Commissioner Mark Samuelian, who sponsored a resolution at Wednesday’s City Commission meeting giving city staff the green light to evaluate several temporary traffic fixes while construction is underway.

March 15, 2019 | Miami Herald | As massive construction project looms, Miami Beach studies ‘emergency’ traffic measures

Are red light cameras here to stay in Miami Beach? New study bolsters support for program

“One of the things that is most striking to me is that even when the red light camera is not there, in the nearby intersections people are maybe aware of it and think more about it and there are safety benefits there,” said Commissioner Mark Samuelian. “My leaning would be to look at expanding based on these results.”

December 18, 2018 | Miami Herald | Are red light cameras here to stay in Miami Beach? New study bolsters support for program